NIH Panel Highlights Early Use of Antibody Therapies for Outpatients at High Risk of Disease Progression

In a little noticed update on December 3rd, the NIH COVID-19 Treatment Guidelines for Therapeutic Management of Patients with COVID-19 now clearly highlights – with appropriate caveats – that physicians consider the early use of antibody therapies for outpatients who are at high risk for disease progression.

In the earliest stages of infection, before the host has mounted an effective immune response, anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody-based therapies may have their greatest likelihood of having an effect. In this regard, although there are insufficient data from clinical trials to recommend either for or against the use of any specific therapy in this setting, preliminary data suggests that outpatients may benefit from receiving anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies early in the course of infection. The anti-SARS-CoV-2 monoclonal antibodies bamlanivimab and casirivimab plus imdevimab are available through Emergency Use Authorizations for outpatients who are at high risk for disease progression.  

NIH Treatment Guidelines Therapeutic Management of Patients with COVID-19

This is an important clarification, as many in the medical community had interpreted the NIH statement on the FDA EUA for Eli Lilly’s Bamlanivimab to be negative. The recommendations, however, make it clear that physicians should seriously consider the use of antibody therapies in consultation and consideration of the risk profiles their patients face.

NIH Panel Highlights Early Use of Antibody Therapies for Outpatients at High Risk of Disease Progression
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